Did you know you have access to The Fish Vet’s expertise, no matter where you are in the world?

2014/02/25 at 08:35 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

Are you a pet fish keeper, ornamental fish breeder, retailer or farmer? Are you running public aquaria? Do you use fish in your educational/research institution? Are you an aquaponics or a food fish aquaculture farmer?

Do you use the services of an aquatic veterinarian? Is there one close by?

Did you know that you can access The Fish Vet’s services right where you are?

1. Locally, I provide site visits to my clients. I service clients as far south as Mandurah (and Bremer Bay!) as far north as Yanchep and as far east as Ellenbrook and Armadale. Here, I perform field diagnostics, and I bring along my portable pharmacy to treat your fish’s ailments, or refer you back to fish shops for medicines that they stock.

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2. If you are not exactly local, we can schedule a visit, by flight, to any state in Australia, or overseas.

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3. I can work through your local veterinarian to achieve a suitable outcome. See picture below.

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4. You can consult with me online using the eHow pets platform

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5. If you wish to proceed with a direct phone or email consultation, please select the appropriate item from the shopping cart at http://www.thefishvet.com.au

 6. Alternatively, feel free to search for free information on my blog (thefishvet.com).
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Fish Vetting Techniques and Practical Tips – instructional DVD: Fish Vetting Secrets revealed!

2014/01/21 at 08:30 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | 1 Comment

After attending a multitude of conferences and courses like Aquavet II and Seavet, reading up on the literature, and doing teaching at the university, it’s really hit home to me that: there is no better way to teach or learn, than to show, or be shown.

FISH VETTING TECHNIQUES & PRACTICAL TIPS takes a ‘how to’, hands-on approach to demonstrate veterinary skills employed in working as an aquatic veterinarian. The 105 minute DVD comprises veterinary procedures including taking skin mucus scrapes and gill biopsies, skin ulcer treatment, injecting fish, blood sampling, anaesthesia, surgery, necropsy, histology processing, videos of live microscopic fish pathogens and more… That’s right, I’m giving away all my secrets so that fish clients can have greater access to trained aquatic veterinarians no matter where they are in the world.

After watching this DVD, you can deal with fishes with confidence!

This DVD is ideal for fish veterinarians, aquarists, aquaculturalists, public aquaria, local fish shops and to have handy as a training resource in veterinary schools, laboratories, clinics and zoos. It is a comprehensive resource that incorporates aquatic medicine and pathology.

Make your purchase NOW at http://thefishvet.com.au/shop/shopping.html
Available in two formats: PAL & NTSC (please select the correct item when making your purchase).

dvd

In this series are the following books:

  • Fish Vetting Essentials.
  • Fish Vetting Medicines – Formulary of Fish Treatments.

Dr Richmond Loh (BSc, BVMS, MPhil, MANZCVS, CertAqV) is the 2014 President of the World Aquatic Veterinary Medical Association (WAVMA), Secretary of The Aquatic Animal Health Chapter of the Australian & New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists (ANZCVS), an adjunct lecturer at Murdoch University in Western Australia, an eHow Pets Expert and is a George Alexander Foundation International Fellow. His skill set is unique, having been admitted as a Member of the Australian & New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists (ANZCVS) by examination in the subjects of “Aquatic Animal Health” and in “Pathobiology”. As “The Fish Vet”, he provides veterinary services for a range of clients and they include individual pet fish owners, public aquaria (Aquarium of Western Australia), retailers, wholesalers, fish farmers (ornamental and food fish) and educational institutions (Murdoch University, Edith Cowan University & University of Western Australia).

DVD CONTENTS
Scene 01: Start
Scene 02: GENERAL PROCEDURES
Scene 03: Weighing small fish
Scene 04: Weighing large fish
Scene 05: Medicating a pond
Scene 06: Preparing medicated food
Scene 07: Intramuscular (IM) injections
Scene 08: Intraperitoneal (IP) injections
Scene 09: Injection sites recapitulated
Scene 10: SURGICAL PROCEDURES
Scene 11: Aspirating swimbladder
Scene 12: Surgical weight implantation
Scene 13: Gastric tubing
Scene 14: Skin ulcer treatment
Scene 15: Skin tumour removal & Anaesthesia
Scene 16: Eye enucleation & Anaesthesia
Scene 17: Fish euthanasia
Scene 18: DIAGNOSTICS
Scene 19: Wet preparation Skin mucus scrape & Gill biopsy
Scene 20: Haematology – Blood sampling
Scene 21: Blood film preparation
Scene 22: Packed cell volume (PCV
Scene 23: Bacteriology
Scene 24: Necropsy & Anatomy
Scene 25: Histology processing
Scene 26: FISH PARASITES
Scene 27: Argulus
Scene 28: Lernaea
Scene 29: Ichthyopthirius | Cryptocaryon
Scene 30: Flukes (Gyrodactylus & Dactylogyrus) & Trichodina
Scene 31: Ichthyobodo
Scene 32: Hexamita
Scene 33: Oodinium | Amyloodinium
Scene 34: Tetrahymena | Uronema
Scene 35: Chilodonella | Brooklynella
Scene 36: Peritrichous ciliates
Scene 37: Lymphocystis
Scene 38: Water mite
Scene 39: Air-dried, Diff Quik-stained smears of parasites

The Fish Vet’s veterinary services – integrated innovative solutions.

2012/12/11 at 07:55 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | 1 Comment

In veterinary health care, there may be service boundaries defined by providers’ clinical specialties. The results will be fragmented, inconvenient, inefficient and the outcomes compromised for the solutions you needed yesterday. The Fish Vet’s services are designed to achieve excellent outcomes for clients with customised needs.

Most veterinarians have expertise in single fields. Dr Loh is unique in that he is one of only two veterinarians globally who has post-graduate, Membership qualifications in aquatic animal health and in veterinary pathology, admitted by examination to the Australian and NZ College of Veterinary Scientists. He also holds a research Masters degree. This means that he can solve your problems in the field or laboratory, and can devise strategies for research if the problems are more complex.

Dr Loh is affiliated with many world class organisations, serving as the Secretary of the Aquatic Animal Health Chapter of the Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists, President-elect of the World Aquatic Veterinary Medical Association, a Senior Adjunct Lecturer at Murdoch University’s Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences section and a past Treasurer for the Australian Society of Veterinary Pathologists. He is also a member of the International Association for Aquatic Animal Medicine and a member of the European Association of Fish Pathologists.

The Fish Vet as a one-stop shop, gives the clients a personal connection to the all the veterinary services you require. The Fish Vet’s clients benefit from more convenient and better coordinated access to veterinary services and improved outcomes. The Fish Vet operates a mobile consultancy service and so no matter where you are in Australia, Dr Loh can organise delivery of his services to your pet, your business or your farm.

To find out more, go to -
TheFishVet’s site  or

see the adverts:

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Fish Vetting Medicines: Formulary of Fish Treatments.

2012/11/26 at 02:43 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

With nearly 300 drug entries, it is a comprehensive yet practical, quick access reference; making it an indispensible resource for anyone interested in fish health including veterinarians. It’s like MIMS for fish!

Its content organisation is designed for enhanced navigability with medicines arranged by:

  • Pathogen type (disease causing organisms),
  • Therapeutic use or groups,
  • Common disease conditions,
  • And in alphabetical order.

Read more here.

Fish Vetting Essentials.

2012/05/27 at 12:37 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

The web can be a great resource but you may also find that it is full of contradictory information overload. Like you, I have found that reliable information on fish health, disease and medicine is difficult to come by and is at best, fragmented.

This is why I have published two essential books on aquatic veterinary medicine.

So if you’re serious about fish health, these are two indispensible texts on fish you must have at your fingertips!

Fish Health Professionals – Land the Catch of the Year!

Fish Vetting Essentials is a comprehensive resource that incorporates elements of fish keeping, clinical medicine and fish pathology in a readily digestible form.

Important information for diagnosticians in this book include:

  • how to interpret water quality
  • how to diagnose common fish diseases
  • how to medicate fish
  • how to treat fish diseases using drugs available in standard veterinary clinics.
View sample pages here –  eFishVetEssentialswLinks.
BUY THE BOOKS HERE.

Free Webinar: “Issues Facing Fish & Aquatic Animal Welfare” – in Celebration of World Veterinary Day & the Beginnings of a Global Dialogue

2014/04/23 at 20:10 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Palic, Dusan <d.palic@fisch.vetmed.uni-muenchen.de>
Date: Wed, Apr 23, 2014 at 5:20 PM
Subject: WAVMA Members-L: Fish Welfare Dialogue Webinar announcement
To: WAVMA_Members-L@wavma.org
Dear All,

 

If you have an interest in aquatic animal welfare, this is a great opportunity to share facts & opinions, and discuss multiple topics in the forthcoming dialogue. The announced webinar is a kick-off event for the fish welfare dialogue project spearheaded by WAVMA, LMU and supported by WVA and FVE.

 

Also, please share with forums and colleagues that you think may be interested.

 

Best regards,
Dusan

 

Free Webinar: “Issues Facing Fish & Aquatic Animal Welfare” – in Celebration of World Veterinary Day & the Beginnings of a Global Dialogue

When: Saturday, April 26, 2013 – 13:00 GMT/UTC (click http://tinyurl.com/ktgvpnc for your local time)

Register now ! Click on https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2387014812762073858
If you are unable to participate, be sure to register to receive information on accessing a recording of this webinar, information on future webinars, how to participate in the Fish Welfare Dialogue, and the September 2014 International Fish Welfare Conference

Speaker: Chris Walster, BVMS, MVPH, CertAqV, MRCVS
The Island Veterinary Associates, Stafford, UK

Moderator: Dusan Palic, DVM, PhD, CertAqV
Ludwig-Maximilians University, Tierärztliche Fakultät, Munich Germany

About the Webinar & the Dialogue:

The Webinar
This webinar is in celebration of World Veterinary Day and the beginning of a 6-month international conversation (the “Fish Welfare Dialogue”) on numerous issues concerning the human-animal relationship with aquatic animals. It will introduce some of the important issues (from science to philosophy) that affect how non-governmental organizations, governments, animal owners and society at large, might address the welfare of aquatic animals (particularly finfish and invertebrates).

Post-webinar Dialogue & Conference
As part of the Fish Welfare Dialogue, all webinar participants will have the opportunity to discuss these and other issues through web-based discussion forums. With the hopes of developing realistic, practical and optimal approaches for the welfare of all aquatic animals, and the benefit of mankind, these discussions will serve as the basis for refining how aquatic animal welfare should be addressed at an International Conference on Fish Welfare in Munich, Germany in September 2014.

Organizers & Supporters
This webinar has been organized and coordinated by Ludwig-Maximillians University & the World Aquatic Veterinary Medical Association. Other organisations are invited to participate in and distribute information on the Fish Welfare Dialogue, future Fish Welfare webinars and the 2014 International Fish Welfare Conference. For more information contact admin@fishwelfare.org.
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

GoToWebinar View System Requirements

 

__________________________________________________________
Dušan Palić, D.V.M., MVSc, Ph.D.
Professor and Chair of Fish Diseases and Fisheries Biology
Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians University Munich

Prof. Dr. Dušan Palić
Lehrstuhl für Fischkrankheiten und Fischereibiologie
Tierärztliche Fakultät, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München

Kaulbachstraße 37
80539 München
Deutschland
Email: d.palic@lmu.de
Tel: +49 (0)89 2180 2282

26-April-2014_Fish-Welfare-Dialogue-Webinar(Flier).pdf

Would you like to know the science behind the evidence for, or lack of, regarding fish welfare?

2014/04/23 at 08:03 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

Visibility of fish is ever increasing. The husbandry practices applied to these animals — and the welfare states associated with their use — are emerging issues in national and international science programs, organisations concerned with the treatment of animals, and amongst consumers.

The Diseases of Aquatic Organisms (DAO) journal has a Special Edition that brings together a range of perspectives on aquatic animal welfare, from pragmatic empirical science to ethics, philosophy, and animal rights activism.

Click here for the link to the Open Access articles.

 

 

Dr Loh, The Fish Vet, in Perth, Western Australia is unavailable until 28 April 2014… But still checking out all the fishies along the way.

2014/04/22 at 13:12 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment


Yours sincerely,

Dr Richmond Loh
DipProjMgt, BSc, BVMS, MPhil (Pathology) Murdoch, MANZCVS (Aquatics& Pathobiology), CertAqV, NATA Signatory.
THE FISH VET, Perth, Western Australia.
Veterinary Medicine for fish.
W: http://www.thefishvet.com.au
E: thefishvet
P: +61 (0)421 822 383

How do you mark fish, so you can tell them apart?

2014/04/22 at 08:04 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

All fish look the same? Not all. But some do…

My clients and I certainly tell you that we can tell our pet fishes apart from one another. But how can you tell the difference in fishes that you don’t get to know and rarely see? For example, for research purposes.

I found a great site that offers all the different options available to researchers and things that need to be taken into consideration include the welfare of the fish, practicality and cost.

  • Biological (Natural Methods)
    -Parasitic Marks
    -Morphological Marks
    -Genetic Marks
  • Chemical (immersion, injecting, tattooing, or feeding; of alizarin, oxytetracycline, calcein)
  • Physical Internal
    -Body Cavity tags
    -Subcutaneous tags
    -Coded Wire tags
    -Microtags
    -Passive Integrated Transponder tags (PIT)
    -Thermal Tags
    -Radio tags
    -Sonar tags
    -DST GPS Fish Tag, Fish Positioning Sounder and Simrad GPS Sonar
  • Physical External
    -Mutilation
    -Branding
    -Visable Implant Elastomer (VIE)
    -Petersen discs
    -Paper fasteners
    -Strap tags
    -Dangler tags
    -Carlin tag
    -Spaghetti tag
    -Dart tags
    -Anchor tag (Floy tags)

The link to the full article can be found here – http://www.azgfd.gov/w_c/Fish_Tagging_Marking_Techniques.shtml

 

Fish joke for Monday-itis: taking a fish’s temperature

2014/04/20 at 23:05 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

To take your own body temperature, you stick a thermometer under your tongue.

To take a dog’s temperature, you stick the thermometer up its bum.

So, how do you take the temperature of a fish?

The answer is…
:)

You stick the thermometer in :|

… the water :P

That’s right, most fish a poikilotherms (cold blooded), and so their body temperature is the same as the surrounding water. So, their metabolic rate and activity levels are highly dependent on the temperature of its environment. Some can cope with seasonal changes, whereas most tropical fish (including the Siamese fighting fish) require you to maintain water at a tropical temperature of 25-28 degrees Celsius.

How much should I feed my fish?

2014/04/18 at 08:00 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

Recently, I’ve been asked this question on numerous occasions,”How much food do I feed my fish?”

Thinking back on several necropsies I had done, I’ve found goldfish, koi, and aquaponically grown fish to be rather high in abdominal fat content (similar to those adverts by the government about ‘toxic fat’. Bit why is this the case?

Goldfish and koi are a bit of a guts when it comes to food. And many owners are too nice to their fish…and feed them too much… Inadvertently, killing them with kindness.

Fish on average, eat about 1% of their body weight daily. Mature fish that are no longer growing will eat 0.5%, and young rapidly growing fish will eat as much as 2%. Does this vary depending on the seasons? Yes it does, and see a previous post (https://thefishvet.com/2011/06/23/how-often-should-i-feed-my-fishes/)

Aquaponically grown fish tend to be on a diet that enables them to grow at an accelerated rate and such foods tend to contain a lot of fat and protein. And this explains why they are so fatty.

The excess fat is stored by the fish in its abdomen. It occupies space in a cavity that’s rather rigid and non-distendable. There is no health implications for the fish cultured for food since they will be harvested relatively young, but what impact will it have for the pet fish who are to live for years?’

Do fish drink water?

2014/04/17 at 16:05 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

You’ve heard of the saying, “To drink like a fish!” But do they drink? This is a question posted on my Facebook Fanpage today.

I’m going to give you a ‘yes’ and a ‘no’ answer. Let me explain.

Marine fish do drink large amounts of water to maintain hydration. They produce small amounts of minimally concentrated urine. Much of the excess salts are removed instead, through their gills.

Fish that live in freshwater don’t exactly drink water, but they absorb it from their environment through their skin and gills; in a process called osmosis. They then have to expend energy to get rid of the excess water by producing lots of dilute urine.

This is why when freshwater fish get sick, they start to bloat and present with dropsy (see previous post – http://thefishvet.com/2013/10/22/is-there-a-cure-for-dropsy-in-fish-thefishvets-secrets-revealed/). This is the reason for altering the salinity of the fish’s environment when they get sick.


Yours sincerely,

Dr Richmond Loh
DipProjMgt, BSc, BVMS, MPhil (Pathology) Murdoch, MANZCVS (Aquatics& Pathobiology), CertAqV, NATA Signatory.
THE FISH VET, Perth, Western Australia.
Veterinary Medicine for fish.
W: http://www.thefishvet.com.au
E: thefishvet
P: +61 (0)421 822 383

Can tails and fins of Betta fish re-grow, like our hair or nails?

2014/04/17 at 08:00 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

I received this question recently and it’s quite a common one I get asked. Very often, fish injure themselves during a fight and they may sustain damage to their fins and scales. Do they repair and do they regrow?

Yes, tails and fins can regrow, but usually, not necessarily to the same length. But unlike hair and nails, the tissues in the fins are living. Scales can regrow, similar to nails, so long as the scale pits are not damaged. I often pluck scales away from ulcerated areas to help healing because the calcified structures may inhibit quick repair. I also pluck scales in preparation for surgery, along the incision site.

There are so many things that can regrow in fish. In fact, researchers are studying the zebrafish on just how they do so. Research has shown that zebrafish can regenerate not only their fins and scales, but also the liver, pancreas, heart and spinal cord! When they understand the mechanisms these fish use to regenerate their organs, the information can be used to try to help human patients.

How do you cool water in a fish tank?

2014/04/16 at 14:41 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

Although we’re heading into the middle of autumn, there are still some warm days around. Some of your temperate fish may have been lucky to survive several heat waves, but be aware that a more permanent type water cooling might be necessary for future summers.

In the meantime, take a look at a previous post (an oldie, but a goodie) – http://thefishvet.com/2012/01/24/how-do-protect-fish-from-the-heat/

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Yours sincerely,

Dr Richmond Loh DipProjMgt, BSc, BVMS, MPhil (Pathology) Murdoch, MANZCVS (Aquatics & Pathobiology), CertAqV, NATA Signatory.
Aquatic Veterinarian | Adjunct Lecturer Murdoch University | President WAVMA |
Secretary Aquatic Animal Health Chapter – ANZCVS.
THE FISH VET, Perth, Western Australia, AUSTRALIA. Mobile Aquatic Veterinary Medical & Diagnostic Services.
http://www.thefishvet.com.au
Ph: +61 (0)421 822 383
Skype: thefishvet

Looking for more books? Check out this site.

The Fish Vet - Perth, WAwavma.jpg?w=780

Who are some of the Australian aquatic veterinarians?

2014/04/16 at 08:00 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

Last week I was asked, “Who are some of the experts in aquatic veterinary medicine?”

Off the top of my head, I listed some Aussie fish vets’ names.

Some of the “oldies” who’ve postgraduate qualifications and experience related to aquatic animal health include Drs:
Matt Landos
Stephen Pyecroft
Judith Handlinger
Richmond Loh
Robert Jones
Alistair Brown
Rachel Bowater
Roger Chong
Ian Anderson
Susan Kueh
David Blyde
Zoe Spiers

Some of the new veterinary graduates include Drs:
Brett DePoister
Sandy Ypelaan
Jo Bannister
Erin Kelly

Of course there are more than these and they can include those who dabble in aquatics either clinically, or in pathology, research and welfare sectors. The list also continues to grow as more and more veterinarians are paying greater attention to this traditionally neglected area.

At last count, according to Dr Pin Needham, while he was preparing his presentation at the IAAAM Conference in Gold Coast, there are at least 100 Australian veterinarians who deal with aquatic animals in some form or other.

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