Did you know you have access to The Fish Vet’s expertise, no matter where you are in the world?

2014/02/25 at 08:35 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

Are you a pet fish keeper, ornamental fish breeder, retailer or fish farmer? Are you running public aquaria? Do you use fish in your educational/research institution? Are you an aquaponics or a food fish aquaculture farmer?

Do you use the services of an aquatic veterinarian? Is there one close by?

Did you know that you can access The Fish Vet’s services right where you are?

1. Locally, I provide site visits to my clients. I service clients as far south as Mandurah (and Bremer Bay!) as far north as Yanchep and as far east as Ellenbrook and Armadale. Here, I perform field diagnostics, and I bring along my portable pharmacy to treat your fish’s ailments, or refer you back to fish shops for medicines that they stock.

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2. If you are not exactly local, we can schedule a visit, by flight, to any state in Australia (e.g. WA, NSW, Victoria, Tasmania), or overseas (e.g. Singapore, Malaysia, New Zealand, Hong Kong).

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3. I can work through your local veterinarian to achieve a suitable outcome. See picture below.

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4. You can consult with me online using the eHow pets platform

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5. If you wish to proceed with a direct phone or email consultation, please select the appropriate item from the shopping cart at http://www.thefishvet.com.au/shop/shopping.html

 6. Alternatively, feel free to search for free information on my blog (thefishvet.com).
(Quick link to this post – http://tinyurl.com/fishvetconsult)
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Fish Vetting Techniques and Practical Tips – instructional DVD: Fish Vetting Secrets revealed!

2014/01/21 at 08:30 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | 1 Comment

After attending a multitude of conferences and courses like Aquavet II and Seavet, reading up on the literature, and doing teaching at the university, it’s really hit home to me that: there is no better way to teach or learn, than to show, or be shown.

FISH VETTING TECHNIQUES & PRACTICAL TIPS takes a ‘how to’, hands-on approach to demonstrate veterinary skills employed in working as an aquatic veterinarian. The 105 minute DVD comprises veterinary procedures including taking skin mucus scrapes and gill biopsies, skin ulcer treatment, injecting fish, blood sampling, anaesthesia, surgery, necropsy, histology processing, videos of live microscopic fish pathogens and more… That’s right, I’m giving away all my secrets so that fish clients can have greater access to trained aquatic veterinarians no matter where they are in the world.

After watching this DVD, you can deal with fishes with confidence!

This DVD is ideal for fish veterinarians, aquarists, aquaculturalists, public aquaria, local fish shops and to have handy as a training resource in veterinary schools, laboratories, clinics and zoos. It is a comprehensive resource that incorporates aquatic medicine and pathology.

Make your purchase NOW at http://thefishvet.com.au/shop/shopping.html
Available in two formats: PAL & NTSC (please select the correct item when making your purchase).

dvd

In this series are the following books:

  • Fish Vetting Essentials.
  • Fish Vetting Medicines – Formulary of Fish Treatments.

Dr Richmond Loh (BSc, BVMS, MPhil, MANZCVS, CertAqV) is the 2014 President of the World Aquatic Veterinary Medical Association (WAVMA), Secretary of The Aquatic Animal Health Chapter of the Australian & New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists (ANZCVS), an adjunct lecturer at Murdoch University in Western Australia, an eHow Pets Expert and is a George Alexander Foundation International Fellow. His skill set is unique, having been admitted as a Member of the Australian & New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists (ANZCVS) by examination in the subjects of “Aquatic Animal Health” and in “Pathobiology”. As “The Fish Vet”, he provides veterinary services for a range of clients and they include individual pet fish owners, public aquaria (Aquarium of Western Australia), retailers, wholesalers, fish farmers (ornamental and food fish) and educational institutions (Murdoch University, Edith Cowan University & University of Western Australia).

DVD CONTENTS
Scene 01: Start
Scene 02: GENERAL PROCEDURES
Scene 03: Weighing small fish
Scene 04: Weighing large fish
Scene 05: Medicating a pond
Scene 06: Preparing medicated food
Scene 07: Intramuscular (IM) injections
Scene 08: Intraperitoneal (IP) injections
Scene 09: Injection sites recapitulated
Scene 10: SURGICAL PROCEDURES
Scene 11: Aspirating swimbladder
Scene 12: Surgical weight implantation
Scene 13: Gastric tubing
Scene 14: Skin ulcer treatment
Scene 15: Skin tumour removal & Anaesthesia
Scene 16: Eye enucleation & Anaesthesia
Scene 17: Fish euthanasia
Scene 18: DIAGNOSTICS
Scene 19: Wet preparation Skin mucus scrape & Gill biopsy
Scene 20: Haematology – Blood sampling
Scene 21: Blood film preparation
Scene 22: Packed cell volume (PCV
Scene 23: Bacteriology
Scene 24: Necropsy & Anatomy
Scene 25: Histology processing
Scene 26: FISH PARASITES
Scene 27: Argulus
Scene 28: Lernaea
Scene 29: Ichthyopthirius | Cryptocaryon
Scene 30: Flukes (Gyrodactylus & Dactylogyrus) & Trichodina
Scene 31: Ichthyobodo
Scene 32: Hexamita
Scene 33: Oodinium | Amyloodinium
Scene 34: Tetrahymena | Uronema
Scene 35: Chilodonella | Brooklynella
Scene 36: Peritrichous ciliates
Scene 37: Lymphocystis
Scene 38: Water mite
Scene 39: Air-dried, Diff Quik-stained smears of parasites

The Fish Vet’s veterinary services – integrated innovative solutions.

2012/12/11 at 07:55 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | 1 Comment

In veterinary health care, there may be service boundaries defined by providers’ clinical specialties. The results will be fragmented, inconvenient, inefficient and the outcomes compromised for the solutions you needed yesterday. The Fish Vet’s services are designed to achieve excellent outcomes for clients with customised needs.

Most veterinarians have expertise in single fields. Dr Loh is unique in that he is one of only two veterinarians globally who has post-graduate, Membership qualifications in aquatic animal health and in veterinary pathology, admitted by examination to the Australian and NZ College of Veterinary Scientists. He also holds a research Masters degree. This means that he can solve your problems in the field or laboratory, and can devise strategies for research if the problems are more complex.

Dr Loh is affiliated with many world class organisations, serving as the Secretary of the Aquatic Animal Health Chapter of the Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists, President-elect of the World Aquatic Veterinary Medical Association, a Senior Adjunct Lecturer at Murdoch University’s Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences section and a past Treasurer for the Australian Society of Veterinary Pathologists. He is also a member of the International Association for Aquatic Animal Medicine and a member of the European Association of Fish Pathologists.

The Fish Vet as a one-stop shop, gives the clients a personal connection to the all the veterinary services you require. The Fish Vet’s clients benefit from more convenient and better coordinated access to veterinary services and improved outcomes. The Fish Vet operates a mobile consultancy service and so no matter where you are in Australia, Dr Loh can organise delivery of his services to your pet, your business or your farm.

To find out more, go to -
TheFishVet’s site  or

see the adverts:

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Fish Vetting Medicines: Formulary of Fish Treatments.

2012/11/26 at 02:43 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

With nearly 300 drug entries, it is a comprehensive yet practical, quick access reference; making it an indispensible resource for anyone interested in fish health including veterinarians. It’s like MIMS for fish!

Its content organisation is designed for enhanced navigability with medicines arranged by:

  • Pathogen type (disease causing organisms),
  • Therapeutic use or groups,
  • Common disease conditions,
  • And in alphabetical order.

Read more here.

Fish Vetting Essentials.

2012/05/27 at 12:37 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

The web can be a great resource but you may also find that it is full of contradictory information overload. Like you, I have found that reliable information on fish health, disease and medicine is difficult to come by and is at best, fragmented.

This is why I have published two essential books on aquatic veterinary medicine.

So if you’re serious about fish health, these are two indispensible texts on fish you must have at your fingertips!

Fish Health Professionals – Land the Catch of the Year!

Fish Vetting Essentials is a comprehensive resource that incorporates elements of fish keeping, clinical medicine and fish pathology in a readily digestible form.

Important information for diagnosticians in this book include:

  • how to interpret water quality
  • how to diagnose common fish diseases
  • how to medicate fish
  • how to treat fish diseases using drugs available in standard veterinary clinics.
View sample pages here –  eFishVetEssentialswLinks.
BUY THE BOOKS HERE.

How important is aquaculture for feeding the world? Projections.

2014/09/19 at 07:50 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | 2 Comments

From: “Dr. David Scarfe”
Date: 19 September 2014 6:05:12 AWST
Subject: AquaVetMed e-News: Aquaculture feeding the world in 2030

September 17, 2014
Aquaculture considered key to feeding the world in 2030

During the II International Scientific Symposium for Innovation in Marine and Food Industry that opened in Vigo, Spain the director of the Economy and Fisheries Policy of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), Lahsen Adabouch, stated the development of the aquaculture industry and an increased use of resources are two key elements given the higher global demand for seafood. According to a study carried out by the FAO, the World Bank and several scientific institutions, in 2030 aquaculture will provide nearly two-thirds of the global fish consumption, compared to the 51 per cent it currently represents. Adabouch also noted that 29 per cent of fishing grounds worldwide are overexploited so the sector faces huge losses amounting to USD 50,000 million. “Asia encompasses 91 per cent of global aquaculture production [China alone accounts for 61 per cent] so the scope for growth of the industry in other parts of the world is large”

Other future challenges include a boost of offshore aquaculture and improvement of feed quality as micronutrients intake. Adabouch suggested that postharvest losses are greater than those produced with the discards of species having little commercial interest. According to the investigation, about 1,300 million tonnes per year are thrown away because of consumers’ fault or due to deficiencies during storage. Therefore, it is important to “harmonize” and simplify ecolabelling in order to avoid misleading consumers.

During the opening ceremony of the scientific symposium, the Spanish Secretary of Science, Technology and Innovation, María Luisa Poncela, emphasized the “strength” of the Spanish food sector and the development of the associated technological research. However, she admitted that one of its “major weaknesses” is a “high fragmentation” in the productive sector, with “many very small businesses.” For his part, the President of the Xunta de Galicia, Alberto Núñez Feijoo, stated the added value that the research will provide will be “decisive” for the sea-industry complex to maintain its competitiveness and market quotas in a market increasingly globalized, EFEagency reports.

To the Galician President, the future strategy should combine growth with job creation and the boost of, environmentally friendly sustainable industry; and make a “clear commitment” for aquaculture. According to Nuñez Feijoo, it is necessary for third countries’ administrations to commit to practices that regulate and require full food producers and processors guarantees. Meanwhile, the president of the National Association of Manufacturers of Canned Fish and Shellfish (ANFACO-CECOPESCA), Jesus Alonso Escurís, recognized that the achievement of “traceability” is the biggest challenge to ensure food security.

___________________________
AquaVetMed e-News provides information to veterinary and veterinary-allied subscribers concerning aquatic animal medicine, health, welfare, public health and seafood safety, obtained from a variety of sources (largely AquaVetMed subscribers). While provided by the American Veterinary Medical Association’s, Aquatic Veterinary Medicine Committee and are for public distribution, they do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the AVMA or the veterinary profession. See the AVMA Terms of Use (http://tinyurl.com/29h2rf) for further information.

Subscription and Contributions: Interested veterinarians and veterinary-allied professionals can subscribe, unsubscribe, or contribute pertinent news or information, by sending a message with “For AquaVetMed -” and the topic in the subject line, to dscarfe@avma.org. If e-News information is used elsewhere please acknowledge AquaVetMed as the source. Encourage individuals to subscribe rather than distribute through list serves.

Note: Undelivered e-mails will not be resent; Subscribers will be deleted from the list after repeated undelivered or bounced messages and will have to re-subscribe. Messages may contain attachments that will have been scanned for known viruses.

Visit our website: http://www.avma.org
________________________________

An aquarium vet job.

2014/09/18 at 07:20 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

This looks like it’d be the dream job for fish vets. See below.

From: “Dr. David Scarfe”
Date: 17 September 2014 6:49:39 AWST
Subject: AquaVetMed e-News: Associate Veterinarian Position Available – Georgia Aquarium, Atlanta, USA

September 16, 2014
Associate Veterinarian Position Available – Georgia Aquarium, Atlanta, USA

The Georgia Aquarium is seeking applicants for an associate veterinarian. This individual will report directly to the Director of Animal Health. Compensation for this position includes a competitive salary and full benefits, including support of continuing education.

The successful candidate will have the following qualifications:
· DVM or VMD degree from an AVMA accredited college or is ECFVG certified
· A Georgia veterinary license or the ability to obtain one within 3 months
· Minimum of 3 years of experience with full time practice in aquatic animal medicine; ACZM diplomat status preferred
· Strong leadership skills; previous experience supervising/mentoring staff, volunteers and/or students preferred
· Willingness to participate in gross and clinical pathology procedures
· Willingness to participate in scientific studies and clinical projects
· Above average ability to organize, manage time and set priorities while meeting deadlines
· Effective problem analysis and resolution skills and the ability to be flexible and shift priorities to meet needs
· Ability to maintain a high level of professionalism, integrity and confidentiality
· Superior verbal and written communication skill

To see more information about this position go to http://tinyurl.com/nash39x.

The following application materials should be submitted electronically to Tonya Clauss (tclauss@georgiaaquarium.org) by 15 October 2014:
· a curriculum vitae or resume
· a letter of intent reflecting the applicant’s goals in the area of aquatic animal medicine
· 3 letters of recommendation, two of which should be written by veterinarians

___________________________
AquaVetMed e-News provides information to veterinary and veterinary-allied subscribers concerning aquatic animal medicine, health, welfare, public health and seafood safety, obtained from a variety of sources (largely AquaVetMed subscribers). While provided by the American Veterinary Medical Association’s, Aquatic Veterinary Medicine Committee and are for public distribution, they do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the AVMA or the veterinary profession. See the AVMA Terms of Use (http://tinyurl.com/29h2rf) for further information.

Subscription and Contributions: Interested veterinarians and veterinary-allied professionals can subscribe, unsubscribe, or contribute pertinent news or information, by sending a message with “For AquaVetMed -” and the topic in the subject line, to dscarfe@avma.org. If e-News information is used elsewhere please acknowledge AquaVetMed as the source. Encourage individuals to subscribe rather than distribute through list serves.

Note: Undelivered e-mails will not be resent; Subscribers will be deleted from the list after repeated undelivered or bounced messages and will have to re-subscribe. Messages may contain attachments that will have been scanned for known viruses.

Visit our website: http://www.avma.org
________________________________

Animal Welfare Symposium 2014: Humane Endings – In Search of Best Practices for the Euthanasia, Humane Slaughter and Depopulation of Animals.

2014/09/17 at 07:40 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

When & where?
November 3-5, 2014, The Westin O’Hare, Rosemont, Illinois, USA

This symposium will take a comprehensive look at existing best practices for euthanasia, humane slaughter and depopulation across animal species, while exploring research and innovation in the name of continuous improvement. A by-invitation half-day workshop focused on international harmonization of recommendations will follow the 2.5-day event.​

A few of the aquatic animal welfare presentation & posters on the program:
* Overview of humane endings for fish – Roy Yanong
* Pain in fish – Stephen Smith
* Fish slaughter – Hugh Mitchell
* Fish depopulation – Kathy Hartman
* What’s new in fish euthanasia – Daniel Weary
* Aquatic invertebrates – Michael Murray
* Assisting IACUCs with humane endings for fish – Stephen Smith
* Correlating physiological and behavioral studies of stressful events in animals – Craig Johnson
* Challenges in research and the field for fish and aquatic wildlife species – Craig Harms
* The alligator industry—advances in animal welfare from egg to slaughter – Javier Nevarez

Reserve your seat today! Registration for the symposium is now open according to the following schedule:
Registration Opens​​ Closes​ Fee​​ Students​
Early​​ 8/15/14 ​9/16/14 ​$300 ​$150
Regular​​ ​9/16/14 ​10/16/14 ​$325 ​$165
Late​​ ​10/16/14 ​10/26/14 ​$350 ​$175
​Onsite ​11/2/14 ​11/5/14 ​$375 ​$195
Registration will be accepted on a space-available basis.

For more information, to see the full tentative agenda, to register of for hotel reservations go to https://www.avma.org/Events/Symposiums/Pages/2014-Humane-Endings-Symposium.aspx.

We look forward to seeing you at the symposium!
___________________________
AquaVetMed e-News provides information to veterinary and veterinary-allied subscribers concerning aquatic animal medicine, health, welfare, public health and seafood safety, obtained from a variety of sources (largely AquaVetMed subscribers). While provided by the American Veterinary Medical Association’s, Aquatic Veterinary Medicine Committee and are for public distribution, they do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the AVMA or the veterinary profession. See the AVMA Terms of Use (http://tinyurl.com/29h2rf) for further information.

Subscription and Contributions: Interested veterinarians and veterinary-allied professionals can subscribe, unsubscribe, or contribute pertinent news or information, by sending a message with “For AquaVetMed -” and the topic in the subject line, to dscarfe@avma.org. If e-News information is used elsewhere please acknowledge AquaVetMed as the source. Encourage individuals to subscribe rather than distribute through list serves.

Note: Undelivered e-mails will not be resent; Subscribers will be deleted from the list after repeated undelivered or bounced messages and will have to re-subscribe. Messages may contain attachments that will have been scanned for known viruses.

Visit our website: http://www.avma.org
________________________________

Polyculture as a means of parasite control as well as a second crop!

2014/09/16 at 08:00 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

Check out the solution that experts have come up with, for the salmon sea lice problems.

http://www.pressherald.com/2014/09/04/maine-salmon-farms-spawn-sea-lice-solution/

Fish Joke for Mondayitis: Public enemy

2014/09/15 at 00:25 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

Q: What do you call a coral  whose activities were seen as criminal and extremely damaging to society?

 

A: Public anemone number 1.

 

Joke modified as an improvement on Dr Andrew Leingang’s Q:What is the most popular coral? A: Public anemone number one!

:P

Barry Munday Memorial Student Prize in Aquatic Animal Health.

2014/09/12 at 07:50 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

The Aquatic Health Chapter of the Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists is keen to promote the field of aquatic animal health within veterinary schools in Australia and has established the ‘Dr Barry Munday Memorial Student Prize in Aquatic Animal Health’. The College Chapter seeks your assistance in nominating a suitable candidate from your respective institution for the 2014 prize. One prize is on offer for the top candidate from all nominations.

We are seeking nominations for students who have shown demonstrable interest in this field or have exhibited a high level of academic and practical competence in the aquatic animal health teaching program of your respective veterinary institution. The nomination is focused on students in either 4th or 5th year of the veterinary degree or in other year classes when the aquatic animal health program is taught.

Nominations should provide a brief description of the student’s background and some indication of their interests and goals in the field of aquatic animal health. Nominations are to be completed by the student and lecturer /course instructor in the aquatic animal health teaching program.

The closing date for nominations is 30 September 2014. Nominations may be emailed to Richmond Loh (thefishvet@gmail.com), Hon. Secretary, Australian & NZ College of Veterinary Scientists (Aquatic Animal Health Chapter).

The successful student (based on selection criteria in the form and voted by Chapter members) will be awarded with the 2010 edition of E.J.Noga’s -Fish Disease – diagnosis and treatment 2nd edition. This very practical text is considered one of the leading publications in the field of aquatic animal health, valued at $AUD125.

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Are you battling to find a cure for your sick fish?

2014/09/11 at 08:15 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

Take out the guess work, and get the right diagnosis, for the right cure.

Dr Loh is a registered veterinarian who does not guess what’s wrong with your fish. He makes home visits and examines your water quality and fishes under the microscope to establish the cause. It is only then, that you can know what medicines you can treat with.

Fish show signs of illness that are difficult to differentiate between many causes. For example, skin ulcers may be caused by trauma, bacteria, protozoa, flukes or copepods. Each causal agent warrants a different way of treating.

Don’t waste your valuable time and risk losing more and more fish, call The Fish Vet (0421 822 383) straight away.

Free WAVMA webinar on Diseases of Dolphins.

2014/09/10 at 07:46 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | 2 Comments

B-1003 – WAVMA WebCEPD: Diseases of Dolphins.

Join us for afree webinar on Sep 24, 2014 at 8:00 PM AWST.

Register now! https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2690427248653135362

A free WAVMA WebCEPD webinar. This presentation will cover the pathology of select disease conditions that affect dolphins. It will discuss the multifactorial nature of disease in dolphins, the risks and predisposing factors for disease in dolphins; covering common bacterial, mycotic, viral, protozoal and metazoan diseases of dolphins and the clinical signs and gross pathological findings for them.

Speaker: Nahiid Stephens, BVMS, MANZCVS (Pathobiology), PhD Candidate.

When: Wednesday, September 24 2014 – 20:00 (Perth, Western Australia).

Click http://tinyurl.com/o8pw5dv for your local time.

NOTE: this webinar will be recorded. If you register for the live webinar and are unable to attend, you will be sent a link to view the webinar. Want CEPD credit? Registration is required. After viewing the webinar and a successfully completing a brief KSA (knowledge & skills assessment) veterinarians, veterinary students and veterinary technicians/nurses can earn up to 1.5 hrs of CEPD credit). Details will be sent to all who register.

Register now! https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2690427248653135362

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

View System Requirements

Discover more about the World Aquatic Veterinary Medical Association at www.WAVMA.org.

Get listed in the on-line Directory of Aquatic Veterinarians and subscribe toAquaVetMed e-News by registering at www.AquaVetMed.info.

 

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Wildlife, Aquatics, Zoo, Exotics (WAZE) symposium at Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine.

2014/09/09 at 08:35 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

From: “Dr. David Scarfe”
Date: 5 September 2014 2:01:33 AWST
Subject: AquaVetMed: Tufts U. Wildlife, Aquatic, Zoo and Exotic Medicine Symposium (Sept 13, 2014)

September 4, 2014
Advancements in Wildlife, Aquatic, Zoo and Exotic Medicine – Saturday, September 13th, 2014 (N. Grafton, MA, USA)

This year’s WAZE (Wildlife, Aquatics, Zoo, Exotics) symposium at Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine will cover a variety of topics on developments in wildlife, aquatic, zoo and exotic medicine and husbandry. We will discuss the issues involved in keeping wildlife in captivity, explore the medical management of animal populations in the wild, and learn about the care required by exotic species kept as pets. Wetlabs will give veterinary students and veterinarians a chance to gain hands-on experience with exotic animal physical exams, exotic animal hematology, turtle shell repair, and comparative anatomy.

Topics include:
• Medical Management of Leatherback Sea Turtles
• Husbandry in Avian Health
• Beluga Whale Research
• Fish Surgery and Anesthesia
• Medical Management of Horseshoe Crabs
• Big Cats in Captivity

This symposium qualifies for 6 hours of continuing education credit. Please note whether you will be attending for credit when registering.

For more information and to register, go to http://sites.tufts.edu/wazesymposiumfall2014. Additional flyers are attached.

___________________________
AquaVetMed e-News provides information to veterinary and veterinary-allied subscribers concerning aquatic animal medicine, health, welfare, public health and seafood safety, obtained from a variety of sources (largely AquaVetMed subscribers). While provided by the American Veterinary Medical Association’s, Aquatic Veterinary Medicine Committee and are for public distribution, they do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the AVMA or the veterinary profession. See the AVMA Terms of Use (http://tinyurl.com/29h2rf) for further information.

Subscription and Contributions: Interested veterinarians and veterinary-allied professionals can subscribe, unsubscribe, or contribute pertinent news or information, by sending a message with “For AquaVetMed -” and the topic in the subject line, to dscarfe@avma.org. If e-News information is used elsewhere please acknowledge AquaVetMed as the source. Encourage individuals to subscribe rather than distribute through list serves.

Note: Undelivered e-mails will not be resent; Subscribers will be deleted from the list after repeated undelivered or bounced messages and will have to re-subscribe. Messages may contain attachments that will have been scanned for known viruses.

Visit our website: http://www.avma.org
________________________________

Can freshwater goldfish and marine clownfish live together?

2014/09/08 at 16:57 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

This was shared by one of my students.

What’s the meaning of this?

Looks like marines living in freshwater, perhaps hard freshwater.

I wonder what sort of physiological stress it’d put fish under.

See:

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