This drug-delivering PowerGel is the Band-Aid for fish – that works!

2015/12/10 at 07:01 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

Human beings have so many kinds of wound dressing, but it’s unlikely an injured fish can ever wear a Band-Aid quite like humans.

Dr Richmond Loh at TheFishVet has pioneered using a special powder, that when applied to fish skin, will stick to it, forming a gel-like material that can be used as a “smart fish band-aid”.

The PowerGel fish bandage matrix has numerous advantages. It can be applied to any area of the body, including delicate structures like fins; is able to absorb any aqueous liquid, allowing the gel to be impregnated with a variety of medicines like antibiotics, allowing direct localised activity for sustained release over time.

“I’ve been using it clinically for the last 10+ years. It’s worked on freshwater and marine turtles, freshwater and marine teleosts, amphibians and crabs. I’ve only two cases where it’s not stuck (Wobbegong shark skin ulcer, and dolphin mouth ulcer)… I’ve since got veterinarians around the world who work at zoos and aquariums, using it. They think it’s amazing stuff!” says Dr Loh.

The PowerGel Fish Bandage would prove an excellent solution for things like the treatment of skin ulcers, burns, post-incision wound care, finrot and other external skin conditions.

It’s A MUST-HAVE for every fish emergency kit.

Watch how it works – http://youtu.be/GHJtZRrx8IU

Get it today, because sick fish can’t wait.

Visit http://www.thefishvet.com.au/shop/shopping.html

Follow me on: Facebook “Fin Page” YouTube Blog Linkedin Twitter


Yours sincerely,

Dr Richmond Loh
DipProjMgt, BSc, BVMS, MPh (Pathology), MANZCVS (Aquatics & Pathobiology), CertAqV, CMAVA, NATA Signatory.
Aquatic Veterinarian & Veterinary Pathologist
THE FISH VET, Perth, Western Australia, AUSTRALIA.
Mobile Aquatic Veterinary Medical & Diagnostic Services.
http://www.thefishvet.com.au
Ph: +61 (0)421 822 383
Skype: thefishvet
President WAVMA 2014
Adjunct Lecturer Murdoch University
See advert on YouTube.

Did you know you have access to The Fish Vet’s expertise, no matter where you are in the world?

2014/02/25 at 08:35 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

Are you a pet fish keeper, ornamental fish breeder, retailer or fish farmer? Are you running public aquaria? Do you use fish in your educational/research institution? Are you an aquaponics or a food fish aquaculture farmer?

Do you use the services of an aquatic veterinarian? Is there one close by?

Did you know that you can access The Fish Vet’s services right where you are?

1. Locally, I provide site visits to my clients. I service clients as far south as Mandurah (and Bremer Bay!) as far north as Yanchep and as far east as Ellenbrook and Armadale. Here, I perform field diagnostics, and I bring along my portable pharmacy to treat your fish’s ailments, or refer you back to fish shops for medicines that they stock.

20140218-140551.jpg

2. If you are not exactly local, we can schedule a visit, by flight, to any state in Australia (e.g. WA, NSW, Victoria, Tasmania), or overseas (e.g. Singapore, Malaysia, New Zealand, Hong Kong).

20140218-140423.jpg

3. I can work through your local veterinarian to achieve a suitable outcome. See picture below.

20140218-135647.jpg

4. If you wish to proceed with a direct phone or email consultation, please select the appropriate item from the shopping cart at http://www.thefishvet.com.au/shop/shopping.html

 5. Alternatively, feel free to search for free information on my blog (thefishvet.com).
(Quick link to this post – http://tinyurl.com/fishvetconsult)

Fish Vetting Techniques and Practical Tips – instructional DVD: Fish Vetting Secrets revealed!

2014/01/21 at 08:30 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | 1 Comment

There is no better way to teach or learn, than to show, or be shown.

FISH VETTING TECHNIQUES & PRACTICAL TIPS reveals the best ways to treat any type of fish.

This DVD is the most valuable resource for all fish vets, aquarists, fish shop owners, vet schools and zoos – so buy it now!

All your questions about veterinary procedures on treating all fish types are answered in this DVD.

Experienced Australian fish vet Dr Richmond Loh takes you on an absorbing journey into the world of fish vetting: learn how to take skin mucus scrapes and blood samples, inject fish, videos of live microscopic fish pathogens and more… That’s right, I’m giving away all my secrets so that fish clients can have greater access to trained aquatic veterinarians no matter where they are in the world.

Don’t wait! Order a copy of Fish Vetting Techniques & Practical Tips.

Buy a copy now – soon you will be able to treat any fish with full confidence!

This DVD is ideal for fish veterinarians, aquarists, aquaculturalists, public aquaria, local fish shops and to have handy as a training resource in veterinary schools, laboratories, clinics and zoos. It is a comprehensive resource that incorporates aquatic medicine and pathology.

Make your purchase NOW at http://thefishvet.com.au/shop/shopping.html
Available in two formats: PAL & NTSC (please select the correct item when making your purchase).

dvd

In this series are the following books:

  • Fish Vetting Essentials.
  • Fish Vetting Medicines – Formulary of Fish Treatments.

Dr Richmond Loh (BSc, BVMS, MPhil, MANZCVS, CertAqV) is the 2014 President of the World Aquatic Veterinary Medical Association (WAVMA), Secretary of The Aquatic Animal Health Chapter of the Australian & New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists (ANZCVS), an adjunct lecturer at Murdoch University in Western Australia, an eHow Pets Expert and is a George Alexander Foundation International Fellow. His skill set is unique, having been admitted as a Member of the Australian & New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists (ANZCVS) by examination in the subjects of “Aquatic Animal Health” and in “Pathobiology”. As “The Fish Vet”, he provides veterinary services for a range of clients and they include individual pet fish owners, public aquaria (Aquarium of Western Australia), retailers, wholesalers, fish farmers (ornamental and food fish) and educational institutions (Murdoch University, Edith Cowan University & University of Western Australia).

The Fish Vet’s veterinary services – integrated innovative solutions.

2012/12/11 at 07:55 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | 1 Comment

In veterinary health care, there may be service boundaries defined by providers’ clinical specialties. The results will be fragmented, inconvenient, inefficient and the outcomes compromised for the solutions you needed yesterday. The Fish Vet’s services are designed to achieve excellent outcomes for clients with customised needs.

Most veterinarians have expertise in single fields. Dr Loh is unique in that he is one of only two veterinarians globally who has post-graduate, Membership qualifications in aquatic animal health and in veterinary pathology, admitted by examination to the Australian and NZ College of Veterinary Scientists. He also holds a research Masters degree. This means that he can solve your problems in the field or laboratory, and can devise strategies for research if the problems are more complex.

Dr Loh is affiliated with many world class organisations, serving as the Secretary of the Aquatic Animal Health Chapter of the Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists, President-elect of the World Aquatic Veterinary Medical Association, a Senior Adjunct Lecturer at Murdoch University’s Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences section and a past Treasurer for the Australian Society of Veterinary Pathologists. He is also a member of the International Association for Aquatic Animal Medicine and a member of the European Association of Fish Pathologists.

The Fish Vet as a one-stop shop, gives the clients a personal connection to the all the veterinary services you require. The Fish Vet’s clients benefit from more convenient and better coordinated access to veterinary services and improved outcomes. The Fish Vet operates a mobile consultancy service and so no matter where you are in Australia, Dr Loh can organise delivery of his services to your pet, your business or your farm.

To find out more, go to –
TheFishVet’s site  or

see the adverts:

20121207-220734.jpg

Fish Vetting Medicines: Formulary of Fish Treatments.

2012/11/26 at 02:43 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

With nearly 300 drug entries, it is a comprehensive yet practical, quick access reference; making it an indispensible resource for anyone interested in fish health including veterinarians. It’s like MIMS for fish!

Its content organisation is designed for enhanced navigability with medicines arranged by:

  • Pathogen type (disease causing organisms),
  • Therapeutic use or groups,
  • Common disease conditions,
  • And in alphabetical order.

Read more here.

Fish Vetting Essentials.

2012/05/27 at 12:37 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

The web can be a great resource but you may also find that it is full of contradictory information overload. Like you, I have found that reliable information on fish health, disease and medicine is difficult to come by and is at best, fragmented.

This is why I have published two essential books on aquatic veterinary medicine.

So if you’re serious about fish health, these are two indispensible texts on fish you must have at your fingertips!

Fish Health Professionals – Land the Catch of the Year!

Fish Vetting Essentials is a comprehensive resource that incorporates elements of fish keeping, clinical medicine and fish pathology in a readily digestible form.

Important information for diagnosticians in this book include:

  • how to interpret water quality
  • how to diagnose common fish diseases
  • how to medicate fish
  • how to treat fish diseases using drugs available in standard veterinary clinics.
View sample pages here –  eFishVetEssentialswLinks.
BUY THE BOOKS HERE.

Recorded Aquatic Veterinary Lectures & Presentations – Select University of Florida, College of Veterinary Medicine Guest Lecture Series

2016/02/05 at 07:20 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

Check out these great resources available at – wavma.org
Ellen Ariel, PhD “Turtle Tribulations in Australia” discussing different types of marine turtles and problems they encounter (45 minutes, given June 4, 2015)
Matt Gray, PhD “Ranaviruses: Cry Wolf or Real Threat?” dealing with the pathobiology & epidemiology of ranaviruses in amphibians & fish (1 hr, given Feb 3, 2014)
Laurie Richardson, PhD “Challenges and Approaches to the Study of Coral Health and Disease” about coral reef conservation issues, trends, drivers & causes of coral reef die offs, and challenges posed by diseases (1 hr, given Feb 26, 2014)
John Reynolds, PhD “Aquatic Animal Health in a Changing World: What is a health professional to do?” concerning conservation medicine and ecological biodiversity of marine mammals, and what may be achievable in the future (1 hr, given March 26, 2014)
Iske Larkin, PhD “Conservation Issues of Aquatic Animals” dealing with how aquatic animals & human activities fit into conservation medicine, and the interactions that are necessary for balanced ecosystems (1 hr, given Aug. 21, 2013)
Martine de Wit, DVM “Unusual Manatee Mortality Events” explaining a variety of manatee deaths & how they were investigated to determine the actual cause (1 hr, given Oct 30, 2013)
Michelle Davis, DVM, DACZM “Stranding & Rehabilitation Programs" covering an overview of Sea World’s veterinary rehabilitation of marine mammal, sea turtle, avian & other species, and research programs with these animals (51 min, given Nov. 20, 2013)

Follow me on: Facebook "Fin Page" YouTube Blog Linkedin Twitter


Yours sincerely,

Dr Richmond Loh
DipProjMgt, BSc, BVMS, MPh (Pathology), MANZCVS (Aquatics & Pathobiology), CertAqV, CMAVA, NATA Signatory.
Aquatic Veterinarian & Veterinary Pathologist
THE FISH VET, Perth, Western Australia, AUSTRALIA.
Mobile Aquatic Veterinary Medical & Diagnostic Services.
http://www.thefishvet.com.au
Ph: +61 (0)421 822 383
Skype: thefishvet

President WAVMA 2014

Adjunct Lecturer Murdoch University
See advert on YouTube.

Ewww! Oysters with herpes! Bloody POMS!

2016/02/04 at 05:22 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

Just did an attention-grabbing headline. It could give people the wrong impression. But seriously, this is why biosecurity is a must for all farmed animals, supported by good surveillance and comprehensive testing.

Read more about the incident at this link –
http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2016-02-02/poms-oyster-disease-found-in-tasmania-for-first-time/7132580

A fact sheet produced by the government and oyster growers can be accessed at this link.
2011-043-POMS Long Version – Q A Fact Sheet.pdf
 

Yours sincerely,

Dr Richmond Loh 

DipProjMgt, BSc, BVMS, MPhil (Pathology), MANZCVS (Aquatics& Pathobiology), CertAqV, NATA Signatory.
THE FISH VET, Perth, Western Australia, AUSTRALIA. 

Mobile Aquatic Veterinary Medical & Diagnostic Services.
http://www.thefishvet.com.au
Ph: +61 (0)421 822 383

What’s the difference between a yabby, marron, gilgie/jilgie, and Australian freshwater lobster?

2016/02/03 at 07:55 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

Nice one I came across in today’s newspaper.

image

Invitation to Help the Next Generation of Aquatic Veterinarians

2016/02/02 at 07:38 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

Have you been frustrated that there are no fish vets near you? Well, here’s a way you can help to change that!

For more than 10 years, WAVMA has developed many programs to serve the discipline of aquatic veterinary medicine, advancing the profession for the betterment of animals, society at large, and the world we live in. Two of the programs that focus specifically on veterinary students are the WAVMA Aquatic Veterinary Student Externship List and the John L. Pitts Aquatic Veterinary Education Awards Program.

The Education Awards Program’s goal is to assist veterinary students and new veterinary graduates in becoming more involved with aquatic veterinary medicine by providing financial support for activities that broaden their understanding of the varied career opportunities within the field. Since its inception in 2010, the Program has awarded over $38,000 to 58 veterinary students and recent graduates from 37 colleges and universities across 4 continents. These funds, which have come from a small number of individuals and organizations, have helped recipients participate in externships at public, private, and academic institutions and attend conferences, workshops, and short courses all over the world, as detailed in the attachment. We need your help to ensure the Program is sustainable and continues to grow.

The Program was started to honor the late John L. Pitts, DVM, who was passionate about student involvement in the profession and a global approach to aquatic veterinary medicine. His service to the profession began as a veterinary student in 1969 when he helped create a national chapter for the Student American Veterinary Medical Association. John also helped in the formation of the National Association of State Aquaculture Coordinators, the Aquaculture and Seafood Advisory Committee of the AVMA, and he worked tirelessly to shape and encourage the passage of the Minor Uses and Minor Species Act of 2004. To continue John’s vision, a small all-volunteer committee comprised of individuals representing private practice, academia, past recipients, WAVMA student members, and the Pitts family work to administer this program.

From the number of applications that are received each year and the remarkable quality of the applicants, it is clear the Program is filling an important need and making a difference in the lives of people who are shaping the future of aquatic veterinary medicine. We have accomplished a lot. With your help we can do more.

Your donation to the John L. Pitts Aquatic Veterinary Education Awards Program will make a difference. Please help us expand the number of students who are finding their place in the global field of aquatic veterinary medicine.

To make a donation and to learn more about this exciting program, please visit PittsEduAwards-Admin.

Yours sincerely,

Chris Walster BVMS MVPH CertAqV MRCVS

WAVMA President 2015

Nick Saint-Erne, DVM, CertAqV

Certified Aquatic Veterinarian

WAVMA President 2016

Impacts of Pitts Edu Awards Program.pdf

Fish joke for Monday-itis: What do you call the study of the saddest aquatic creature?

2016/02/01 at 07:00 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

Answer: Malacology.

Joke inspired by Prof. Lewbart’s webinar.

Have a FINtastic week! R <+>{

It’s all too easy to blame carp. What is the REAL cause of degraded Australian rivers?

2016/01/29 at 15:34 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

The release of KHV has been deemed necessary by the scientists working on the project, to bring Australian waterways back to their pre-European days, for the purpose of removing non-native carp that cause environmental and predatory effects on native fish populations. Before going down this expensive and irreversible experiment on our national ecosystems, and threaten the lives of every pet koi in Australia, it’d be useful to have a proper review of the popular notion that carp are the great destroyer of the waterways.

In my recent blog (http://wp.me/p1BQjt-1Wc), using publically published government materials, I’ve compared the "carp-infested" waterways (that’ve had massive human intervention) with examples of rivers that are running naturally. There are no carp problems in the latter. Bear in mind that the carp we’re apparently afraid of, are non-aggressive prey-species, whereas those we’re trying to conserve are large carnivores with higher environmental requirements (e.g. water quality, flow, habitat) to complete their life cycles.

The powers have commissioned a company to enumerate the value of the koi and carp industry. What economic value do they have against the food fish or the recreational fishing industry? To koi owners, what is their value, when they are priceless?

KHV is without doubt, a devastating disease. Another question to raise is, what are the animal welfare implications of its release?

Follow me on: Facebook "Fin Page"YouTubeBlogLinkedinTwitter


Yours sincerely,

Dr Richmond Loh DipProjMgt, BSc, BVMS, MPh (Pathology), MANZCVS (Aquatics & Pathobiology), CertAqV, CMAVA, NATA Signatory.
Aquatic Veterinarian & Veterinary Pathologist
THE FISH VET, Perth, Western Australia, AUSTRALIA.
Mobile Aquatic Veterinary Medical & Diagnostic Services.
http://www.thefishvet.com.au
Ph: +61 (0)421 822 383
thefishvet_logo_medical-20130107.jpg
Skype: thefishvet

President WAVMA 2014

wavma.jpg?w=780

Adjunct Lecturer Murdoch University

Fish joke for Monday-itis: why are rayfish good at impromptu speeches?

2016/01/25 at 07:00 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

Answer is…

Because they can wing it.

Have a FINtastic week! R <+>{

It’s all too easy to blame carp. But what is the real cause of the degraded condition of Australia’s rivers?

2016/01/23 at 03:03 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

There’s dialogue occuring within the global aquatic veterinary community (WAVMA) about Australia’s planned release (early 2017) of KHV to kill the apparently feral pest carp.

In a blog by the leading scientist, carp are purported to breed like rabbits (https://blog.csiro.au/reclaiming-our-rivers-from-feral-carp/)? That’s inaccurate. Carp, like many other fish species produce eggs by multiples more.

Australia is one of the few countries remaining free from a variety of animal diseases. Is the intentional release of KHV warranted? Are we being led to believe that carp is the cause of destruction of Australian waterways? Or is it perhaps an easy option to point the finger at them?

There’s growing debate among our peers that carp are decimating native fish populations, sometimes contributing up to 90% of the biomass of certain aquatic environments. We cannot argue with facts. But are we making the right interpretations and assumptions from this fact?

I did some quick research on Australian government websites to see what they say is the real problem with our waterways. Here’s what I found.

The information below is taken from: http://www.australia.gov.au/about-australia/australian-story/austn-rivers-with-regulated-flows

"The health of Australian rivers is measured against their condition before European settlement…."

"Murray–Darling Basin, have had their flows regulated by humans [] in a massive engineering scheme… these changes in water management have affected the flow and quality of water in the Murray–Darling and salinity is a major issue… has affected the plants and wildlife. In the same period… there was extensive removal of most of the native vegetation… The led to erosion and, along with overgrazing and the building of levee banks, has dramatically affected the flow… and the natural river environment."

"The problem of more water being taken out of Australian rivers than is going into them has also created issues with flow. A river needs a certain amount of water to flow properly, to provide the right living conditions for animals and fish, and to provide enough water for plants."

"The waters of Australian rivers are also being affected by the addition of certain substances, like sediment and nutrients.. such as fertilisers used on crops, … when there are too many nutrients in a river, an algal bloom will occur… When the algae in algal blooms eventually dies, it can kill the other kinds of plants and animals that live in the river.

Sediment occurs when dust and dirt resulting from erosion gets into the river water. Removing trees and plants from an area can greatly increase the rate of erosion. Over grazing with large numbers of animals like sheep and cows can also contribute to erosion. More erosion means more sediment and rivers with high amounts of sediment can kill the plants and animals that live in them."

In contrast, there are wild free flowing rivers in other parts of Australia. In these rivers carp are not key threats, they are not present, nor are they potentially present:

So now the question needs to be asked. Are carp occupying a degraded niche, or are they really causing the degradation? Is the state of our rivers a man-made phenomenon?

Bear in mind that when you point your finger at carp, there are three fingers pointing back at you.

Native fish flourish in natural rivers. Carp merely occupy disturbed waterways.

The truth is out there.

Follow me on: Facebook "Fin Page"YouTubeBlogLinkedinTwitter


Yours sincerely,

Dr Richmond Loh DipProjMgt, BSc, BVMS, MPh (Pathology), MANZCVS (Aquatics & Pathobiology), CertAqV, CMAVA, NATA Signatory.
Aquatic Veterinarian & Veterinary Pathologist
THE FISH VET, Perth, Western Australia, AUSTRALIA.
Mobile Aquatic Veterinary Medical & Diagnostic Services.
http://www.thefishvet.com.au
Ph: +61 (0)421 822 383
thefishvet_logo_medical-20130107.jpg
Skype: thefishvet

President WAVMA 2014

wavma.jpg?w=780

Adjunct Lecturer Murdoch University

Secrets revealed – HOW TO videos – by The Fish Vet.

2016/01/20 at 11:28 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

Fish Vetting Techniques & Practical Tips arms you with tools on the best ways to diagnose and treat any type of diseased fish.

This DVD with its videos makes it the single most comprehensive resource for every fish veterinarian, fish farm manager, fish hobbyist, biology student, veterinary school, zoo and aquaria.

All your questions about veterinary procedures on treating all fish types are answered in this DVD.

Experienced Australian aquatic veterinarian, Dr Richmond Loh, takes you on an absorbing journey into the world of fish vetting: learn how to take diagnostic samples, how to treat fish, and even how to anaesthetise fish and perform surgery!

Buy a copy now – soon you will be able to see how Dr Loh treats fish with full confidence!

Don’t wait! Order a copy of Fish Vetting Techniques & Practical Tips at http://thefishvet.com.au/shop/shopping.html

WAVMA free webinar – Demystifying Aquatic Veterinary Antimicrobial Testing & Resistance

2016/01/19 at 01:37 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

About this webinar: This presentation will focus on current antimicrobial testing methods for a wide-range of aquatic bacteria, as well as a recommended approach to interpret results for the most accurate clinical application possible. Interpreting MIC and Kirby-Bauer data and antimicrobial resistance in an enigma for many. Interpreting MIC and zone diameter data from in vitro, aquatic bacterial antimicrobial susceptibility tests (AST) can be extremely challenging because of a lack of historical comparative data, and figuring out how to use interpretive criteria targeted for human and terrestrial animal application. It is further complicated by a lack of standardized testing methods, quality control, and inconsistent method performance.  However, AST data allows detection of resistant bacteria in patients, populations, or the environment, and can provide guidance for selecting appropriate antimicrobial therapy.

 

Learning Objectives – participants will understand:

1.       Current, standardized and recommended in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods available for aquatic bacteria, and where to locate them;

2.       How to conduct diagnostic laboratory antimicrobial resistance surveillance; and,

3.       How to establish epidemiological cut-off values (ECVs or ECOFFs) and clinical breakpoints for aquatic bacterial infections.

 

This webinar is suitable for veterinarians, vet techs/nurses, vet students and veterinary practice staff.    Feel free to forward this announcement to colleagues.

About the speaker: Dr. Ron Miller PhD, is a microbiologist with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Center for Veterinary Medicine in Rockville, MD.  He currently reviews applications for new animal drugs to ensure their efficacy and safety.  Since 2008 he has also served as Chair of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute’s (CLSI), Subcommittee on Veterinary Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing Working Group on Aquaculture that endeavors to develop standardize methods for bacterial testing.

 

For more information, and to register, follow the link below –

http://www.wavma.org/Webinars/WebCEPD-B-1019-Demystifying-Aquatic-Veterinary-Antimicrobial-Testing-Resistance

 

Yours sincerely,

Dr Richmond Loh 

DipProjMgt, BSc, BVMS, MPhil (Pathology), MANZCVS (Aquatics& Pathobiology), CertAqV, NATA Signatory.
THE FISH VET, Perth, Western Australia, AUSTRALIA. 

Mobile Aquatic Veterinary Medical & Diagnostic Services.
http://www.thefishvet.com.au
Ph: +61 (0)421 822 383

Next Page »

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com. | The Pool Theme.
Entries and comments feeds.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,892 other followers

%d bloggers like this: