Did you know you have access to The Fish Vet’s expertise, no matter where you are in the world?

2014/02/25 at 08:35 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

Are you a pet fish keeper, ornamental fish breeder, retailer or fish farmer? Are you running public aquaria? Do you use fish in your educational/research institution? Are you an aquaponics or a food fish aquaculture farmer?

Do you use the services of an aquatic veterinarian? Is there one close by?

Did you know that you can access The Fish Vet’s services right where you are?

1. Locally, I provide site visits to my clients. I service clients as far south as Mandurah (and Bremer Bay!) as far north as Yanchep and as far east as Ellenbrook and Armadale. Here, I perform field diagnostics, and I bring along my portable pharmacy to treat your fish’s ailments, or refer you back to fish shops for medicines that they stock.

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2. If you are not exactly local, we can schedule a visit, by flight, to any state in Australia (e.g. WA, NSW, Victoria, Tasmania), or overseas (e.g. Singapore, Malaysia, New Zealand, Hong Kong).

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3. I can work through your local veterinarian to achieve a suitable outcome. See picture below.

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4. You can consult with me online using the eHow pets platform

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5. If you wish to proceed with a direct phone or email consultation, please select the appropriate item from the shopping cart at http://www.thefishvet.com.au/shop/shopping.html

 6. Alternatively, feel free to search for free information on my blog (thefishvet.com).
(Quick link to this post – http://tinyurl.com/fishvetconsult)

Fish Vetting Techniques and Practical Tips – instructional DVD: Fish Vetting Secrets revealed!

2014/01/21 at 08:30 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | 1 Comment

After attending a multitude of conferences and courses like Aquavet II and Seavet, reading up on the literature, and doing teaching at the university, it’s really hit home to me that: there is no better way to teach or learn, than to show, or be shown.

FISH VETTING TECHNIQUES & PRACTICAL TIPS takes a ‘how to’, hands-on approach to demonstrate veterinary skills employed in working as an aquatic veterinarian. The 105 minute DVD comprises veterinary procedures including taking skin mucus scrapes and gill biopsies, skin ulcer treatment, injecting fish, blood sampling, anaesthesia, surgery, necropsy, histology processing, videos of live microscopic fish pathogens and more… That’s right, I’m giving away all my secrets so that fish clients can have greater access to trained aquatic veterinarians no matter where they are in the world.

After watching this DVD, you can deal with fishes with confidence!

This DVD is ideal for fish veterinarians, aquarists, aquaculturalists, public aquaria, local fish shops and to have handy as a training resource in veterinary schools, laboratories, clinics and zoos. It is a comprehensive resource that incorporates aquatic medicine and pathology.

Make your purchase NOW at http://thefishvet.com.au/shop/shopping.html
Available in two formats: PAL & NTSC (please select the correct item when making your purchase).

dvd

In this series are the following books:

  • Fish Vetting Essentials.
  • Fish Vetting Medicines – Formulary of Fish Treatments.

Dr Richmond Loh (BSc, BVMS, MPhil, MANZCVS, CertAqV) is the 2014 President of the World Aquatic Veterinary Medical Association (WAVMA), Secretary of The Aquatic Animal Health Chapter of the Australian & New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists (ANZCVS), an adjunct lecturer at Murdoch University in Western Australia, an eHow Pets Expert and is a George Alexander Foundation International Fellow. His skill set is unique, having been admitted as a Member of the Australian & New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists (ANZCVS) by examination in the subjects of “Aquatic Animal Health” and in “Pathobiology”. As “The Fish Vet”, he provides veterinary services for a range of clients and they include individual pet fish owners, public aquaria (Aquarium of Western Australia), retailers, wholesalers, fish farmers (ornamental and food fish) and educational institutions (Murdoch University, Edith Cowan University & University of Western Australia).

DVD CONTENTS
Scene 01: Start
Scene 02: GENERAL PROCEDURES
Scene 03: Weighing small fish
Scene 04: Weighing large fish
Scene 05: Medicating a pond
Scene 06: Preparing medicated food
Scene 07: Intramuscular (IM) injections
Scene 08: Intraperitoneal (IP) injections
Scene 09: Injection sites recapitulated
Scene 10: SURGICAL PROCEDURES
Scene 11: Aspirating swimbladder
Scene 12: Surgical weight implantation
Scene 13: Gastric tubing
Scene 14: Skin ulcer treatment
Scene 15: Skin tumour removal & Anaesthesia
Scene 16: Eye enucleation & Anaesthesia
Scene 17: Fish euthanasia
Scene 18: DIAGNOSTICS
Scene 19: Wet preparation Skin mucus scrape & Gill biopsy
Scene 20: Haematology – Blood sampling
Scene 21: Blood film preparation
Scene 22: Packed cell volume (PCV
Scene 23: Bacteriology
Scene 24: Necropsy & Anatomy
Scene 25: Histology processing
Scene 26: FISH PARASITES
Scene 27: Argulus
Scene 28: Lernaea
Scene 29: Ichthyopthirius | Cryptocaryon
Scene 30: Flukes (Gyrodactylus & Dactylogyrus) & Trichodina
Scene 31: Ichthyobodo
Scene 32: Hexamita
Scene 33: Oodinium | Amyloodinium
Scene 34: Tetrahymena | Uronema
Scene 35: Chilodonella | Brooklynella
Scene 36: Peritrichous ciliates
Scene 37: Lymphocystis
Scene 38: Water mite
Scene 39: Air-dried, Diff Quik-stained smears of parasites

The Fish Vet’s veterinary services – integrated innovative solutions.

2012/12/11 at 07:55 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | 1 Comment

In veterinary health care, there may be service boundaries defined by providers’ clinical specialties. The results will be fragmented, inconvenient, inefficient and the outcomes compromised for the solutions you needed yesterday. The Fish Vet’s services are designed to achieve excellent outcomes for clients with customised needs.

Most veterinarians have expertise in single fields. Dr Loh is unique in that he is one of only two veterinarians globally who has post-graduate, Membership qualifications in aquatic animal health and in veterinary pathology, admitted by examination to the Australian and NZ College of Veterinary Scientists. He also holds a research Masters degree. This means that he can solve your problems in the field or laboratory, and can devise strategies for research if the problems are more complex.

Dr Loh is affiliated with many world class organisations, serving as the Secretary of the Aquatic Animal Health Chapter of the Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists, President-elect of the World Aquatic Veterinary Medical Association, a Senior Adjunct Lecturer at Murdoch University’s Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences section and a past Treasurer for the Australian Society of Veterinary Pathologists. He is also a member of the International Association for Aquatic Animal Medicine and a member of the European Association of Fish Pathologists.

The Fish Vet as a one-stop shop, gives the clients a personal connection to the all the veterinary services you require. The Fish Vet’s clients benefit from more convenient and better coordinated access to veterinary services and improved outcomes. The Fish Vet operates a mobile consultancy service and so no matter where you are in Australia, Dr Loh can organise delivery of his services to your pet, your business or your farm.

To find out more, go to –
TheFishVet’s site  or

see the adverts:

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Fish Vetting Medicines: Formulary of Fish Treatments.

2012/11/26 at 02:43 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

With nearly 300 drug entries, it is a comprehensive yet practical, quick access reference; making it an indispensible resource for anyone interested in fish health including veterinarians. It’s like MIMS for fish!

Its content organisation is designed for enhanced navigability with medicines arranged by:

  • Pathogen type (disease causing organisms),
  • Therapeutic use or groups,
  • Common disease conditions,
  • And in alphabetical order.

Read more here.

Fish Vetting Essentials.

2012/05/27 at 12:37 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

The web can be a great resource but you may also find that it is full of contradictory information overload. Like you, I have found that reliable information on fish health, disease and medicine is difficult to come by and is at best, fragmented.

This is why I have published two essential books on aquatic veterinary medicine.

So if you’re serious about fish health, these are two indispensible texts on fish you must have at your fingertips!

Fish Health Professionals – Land the Catch of the Year!

Fish Vetting Essentials is a comprehensive resource that incorporates elements of fish keeping, clinical medicine and fish pathology in a readily digestible form.

Important information for diagnosticians in this book include:

  • how to interpret water quality
  • how to diagnose common fish diseases
  • how to medicate fish
  • how to treat fish diseases using drugs available in standard veterinary clinics.
View sample pages here –  eFishVetEssentialswLinks.
BUY THE BOOKS HERE.

Water quality problems – the invisible killer

2015/09/03 at 15:06 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

What’s with your water? What are the unseen problems that can be devastating to your fishes?

Learn about water, by watching a free recorded webinar by The Fish Vet – http://www.wavma.org/Webinars/B-1010-Water-quality-101-for-Practising-Veterinarians

Fighting fish knocks out Brazilian fisherman

2015/09/02 at 12:57 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

Fish don’t have limbs or hands, but can still slap you!

https://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/world/a/29315021/fighting-fish-knocks-out-brazilian-fisherman/

Fish are easy first pets… Really? Not!

2015/09/01 at 06:00 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

What’s often the first pet many people recommend for beginners? A dog, a cat or a horse? You never hear such answers. What’s more common is, fish.

I was talking to a student this morning and it occurred to us that “fish keeping is easy”, is a very common misconception.

How easy can a pet be, that can just die on you in less than a month? No other pet can be more foreign to us, as air-breathing, land-dwelling beings, than fish.

We ask you these questions…
What pet needs life support systems as complex as the hospital’s intensive care unit? What pet needs their water to be monitored more closely than your average swimming pool? What pet has disease that can wipe out entire populations within the space of days? What pet needs food with energy contents higher than elite athletes? The list continues.

Fish are no simple creatures. They are not simply easy.

Bit if you keep them well, you can lean back, relax and enjoy their beauty and unique behaviours.

Fish Jokes for Monday-itis: How do fish pick their nose?

2015/08/30 at 22:55 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

And the answer is…

With a fish finger!

Have a FINtastic week! R <+>{

Why was a helicopter circling Cottesloe beach last weekend?

2015/08/28 at 09:26 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

My suspicions were right. There was a shark sighting.

These fishermen were up close and personal with the great white shark! How lucky (to be on a boat, and not in the water)!

Though, I wouldn’t condone feeding the shark.

Read more here.

Luckily the only surfing is was doing was on the net!

What to do if your fish has bent spine?

2015/08/27 at 08:20 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

Have you seen Arnold Schwazenegar at his prime? Well, he has nothing compared to fish. You see, fish have massive muscles on either side of their spine. Their spine is relatively fragile and is prone to fracture from the forces of muscle contraction. I’ve seen fish with fractures from jumping and landing incorrectly, from electrocution and even from lighting strike!

For those that sustain traumatic injury, could we immobilise it so that it heals straight? Theoretically yes, and external fixateurs and rods come to mind. However, practically no. I believe it’d put the fish in more pain. Having said this, spinal curvatures can get worse with time as their muscles tense and pull on the spine. So it’ll have to be considered on a case-by-case basis. Fish should be rested in a shallow tank, just enough to keep them upright for the next few weeks.

Fish are lucky in that they are supported by the body around them. So they are not under the same forces as us terrestrial dwellers.

Our considered opinion is that so long as your fish is still eating and getting around with ease, then their quality of life will be acceptable.

Follow me on: Facebook "Fin Page" YouTube Blog Linkedin Twitter


Yours sincerely,

Dr Richmond Loh
DipProjMgt, BSc, BVMS, MPhil (Pathology), MANZCVS (Aquatics & Pathobiology), CertAqV, CMAVA, NATA Signatory.
THE FISH VET, Perth, Western Australia, AUSTRALIA.
Mobile Aquatic Veterinary Medical & Diagnostic Services.
http://www.thefishvet.com.au
Ph: +61 (0)421 822 383
Skype: thefishvet

President WAVMA 2014

Adjunct Lecturer Murdoch University | Secretary Aquatic Animal Health Chapter – ANZCVS.

See advert on YouTube.

Mycobacteriosis – the slow, silent fish killer. How can you tell if your fish are infected? Can you catch it?

2015/08/26 at 08:17 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | 2 Comments

The disease is caused by a bacteria in the genus Mycobacteria. Another name for the disease is fish TB (short for fish tuberculosis). It can affect your fish grown in ponds, your aquarium fishes, or your zebrafish facility. Some of the species I’ve frequently diagnosed mycobacteriosis include livebearers (e.g. guppies), rainbow fishes, Bettas (aka Siamese fighting fish), gouramis, danios (e.g. zebrafish), various cichlids and goldfish.

The key to understanding fish tuberculosis and its control is to understand the epidemiology of the disease. The bacteria is present in soil (fish raised in earthen ponds), may be harboured in the filter, and carried by persistently infected fish. The immune system of infected fish mounts a response to encase the bacteria in layers upon layers of white blood cells known as macrophages. But this is never enough to kill the bacteria. The bacteria is slowly allowed to replicate, unchecked, these infected fishes go on to shed large amounts of bacteria for their entire lives.

The disease itself may be difficult to diagnose or even recognise, and is often mistaken for a multitude of different diseases. Clinical signs may include swimming disorders, buoyancy disorders, skin ulcers, bloat, dropsy, pop-eye, appetite loss, ill-thrift and more. The reason for the variable clinical presentations is because it depends on which organ/s are affected. In the accompanying picture, the bacteria (in red colour) has taken over the brain. This is the reason for the neurological presentation. This fish was swimming haphazardly and sustained secondary damage to its mouth. So, basically, a fish infected with Mycobacteria can look like anything (from completely healthy, to having skin ulcers, dropsy, etc.).

Infection with Mycobacteria can impact on the health, growth and productivity of your fishes. Persistently Infected fishes are the most dangerous for your fish population. Their ability to continually shed the bacteria at massive levels for their entire lives makes them a ticking time bomb. And when infected fish die, it can make it even worse! As their carcass become cannibalised, the disease spreads even more quickly to other fish!

What’s more is that the bacteria may infect humans! In humans, it’s called "fish-fancier finger disease".It causes localised hard swollen lesions that may be painful to touch. These need to be surgically removed and the patient would need a long course of multiple antibiotics. Disease is more severe in immunocompromised people (the very young, the aged, those on chemotherapy, etc.).

So, if you have been losing fish every now and then, for reasons unknown, how can you tell if your fish have mycobacteriosis?

Get your fishes vet-checked.

What are you waiting for?

Enquire here – http://thefishvet.com.au/contact_us.html

The Fish Vet’s laboratory services are open to fish owners Australia-wide.

Just another way of making aquatic veterinary services within reach.

Follow me on: Facebook "Fin Page" YouTube Blog Linkedin Twitter


Yours sincerely,

Dr Richmond Loh
DipProjMgt, BSc, BVMS, MPhil (Pathology), MANZCVS (Aquatics & Pathobiology), CertAqV, CMAVA, NATA Signatory.
THE FISH VET, Perth, Western Australia, AUSTRALIA.
Mobile Aquatic Veterinary Medical & Diagnostic Services.
http://www.thefishvet.com.au
Ph: +61 (0)421 822 383
Skype: thefishvet

President WAVMA 2014

Adjunct Lecturer Murdoch University | Secretary Aquatic Animal Health Chapter – ANZCVS.

See advert on YouTube.

What causes spinal deformities in koi? Answers revealed tomorrow night.

2015/08/25 at 06:53 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

Join us at the Southern Branch KSWA meeting on Wed 26 August

Dr Richmond Loh (The Fish Vet) has organised for one of his vet students to make a presentation on Spinal Deformities. Hui Nee Chin is originally from Melbourne, where she completed a Bachelor of Environmental Science (Marine Biology) and is currently a final year veterinary student at Murdoch University.

A study on spinal deformity in koi carp: Adult koi with spinal deformities were sampled from private collections. These koi were presenting with difficulties swimming, were showing changes in swimming behaviour and had visible spinal deformities. After euthanasia, radiographs of each koi were taken at the Veterinary Hospital at Murdoch University. Bony changes suggestive of congenital abnormalities and degenerative changes were found. The cause is unknown, however a variety of factors are known to cause spinal deformities in fish. These will be presented.

Details:
7:30pm, Wednesday 26 August 2015
South Perth Rotary Hall, Sandgate St, South Perth.

Fish Jokes for Monday-itis: What do you get when you cross and elephant with a fish?

2015/08/23 at 22:55 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

swimming trunks!

Have a FINtastic week! R <+>{

A study on spinal deformity in koi carp by Hui Nee Chin.

2015/08/22 at 07:48 | Posted in Veterinary Fish Medicine | Leave a comment

Southern Branch KSWA meeting – Wed 26 August

Dr Richmond Loh (The Fish Vet) has organised for one of his vet students to make a presentation on Spinal Deformities. Hui Nee Chin is originally from Melbourne, where she completed a Bachelor of Environmental Science (Marine Biology) and is currently a final year veterinary student at Murdoch University.

A study on spinal deformity in koi carp: Adult koi with spinal deformities were sampled from private collections. These koi were presenting with difficulties swimming, were showing changes in swimming behaviour and had visible spinal deformities. After euthanasia, radiographs of each koi were taken at the Veterinary Hospital at Murdoch University. Bony changes suggestive of congenital abnormalities and degenerative changes were found. The cause is unknown, however a variety of factors are known to cause spinal deformities in fish. These will be presented.

Details:
7:30pm, Wednesday 26 August 2015
South Perth Rotary Hall, Sandgate St, South Perth.

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